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Salvadoran cuisine

Salvadoran cuisine is a style of cooking derived from the nation of El Salvador. The traditional cuisine consists of food from the Maya, Lenca, Pipil, and Spanish peoples. Many of the dishes are made with maize (corn).

El Salvador's most notable dish is the pupusa, a thick handmade corn flour or rice flour tortilla stuffed with cheese, chicharrón (cooked pork meat ground to a paste consistency), refried beans, and/or loroco (a vine flower bud native to Central America). There are also vegetarian options, often with ayote (a type of squash), or garlic. Some adventurous restaurants even offer pupusas stuffed with shrimp or spinach.

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Introducing El Salvador

El Salvador sneaks up on you: in lefty lounge bars in San Salvador, at sobering museums and war memorials, and along lush cloud-forest trails; it's a place of remarkable warmth and intelligence, made all the more appealing for being so unexpected. Travellers tend to skip El Salvador, wooed by marquee destinations such as Guatemala and Costa Rica, and unnerved by stories of civil war and gang violence. But the war ended almost 20 years ago, and crime, while serious, is almost exclusively played out between rival gangs; tourists are virtually never involved. And though El Salvador has fewer protected areas than its neighbors, you get them practically to yourself – including pristine forests, active volcanoes and sparkling lakes.

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El Salvadors nationalflag

Flaget blev officielt i 1972, men har været i brug langt tidligere, fra ca. 1838 til 1865 og igen fra 1912.

Det symboliserer solidaritet med de andre centralamerikanske stater. De to blå striber står for Det Caribiske Hav og Stillehavet.

Flaget minder meget om flagene fra Guatemala, Honduras og Nicaragua.

 

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